Boxes on a Beak

raven

I know, I’m reaching on this one. Boxes on a beak? What in the world is she talking about? Well, you see, the Inktober topic is “box” for today, and I was set on drawing a raven since it’s the time of year and all.. so there you go, boxes on a beak! 

When I was in elementary school, there was an aged, dilapidated house right next door to our building. A cliche, grumpy, old man lived in the house that was surrounded by a wall of pine trees. The story was that the old man hated people, and never talked to anyone; but he talked to the animals. 

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Backwards Escape

escape

My escape usually involves a good book and a warm, comfy chair. But how do the characters within my books escape the stressors of their situations? Turn your back on your library for one moment, and you might find out…

Once again messing around for Inktober. Not sure how I feel about the result of this one, but there comes a time when I can’t force my photoshop skills to level up on command and I have to call it good. 

Inktober 2016: Escape

The Waste of Waiting

battle

Rather than waiting for the jaws of death to do their thing, Frank decided that a gentlemanly battle was more appropriate. Although a sharp stick was used in place of the customary slapping glove, Frank felt justified since his aggressor was well outside his weight class. 

Just some more fun with Inktober. This is the result of Jump

Inktober 2016: Battle

Clever Critter

fox

There is nothing clumsy about the clever fox when it comes to hunting. The wonderfully fuzzy face, tilting back and forth in response to sounds pitiful human ears can’t pick up on. The prancing and pouncing that proceed the perfect posture of the jump, the purely predatory progress of the powerful pup, leave the viewer pleased if not slightly perplexed. I find it hard to root for the escape of the rodent after such a display.  

Inktober 2016: Jump
I’m a little disappointed at how far behind I am for Inktober. I’m scrambling to catch up and keep up. Hopefully this isn’t a foretelling of what NaNoWriMo will be like. 

3 Quotations in 3 Days – Day 2

bellafield

There are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.

– Albert Einstein

Day 2 of the 3 Quotations in 3 Days Challenge. If you are interested in joining, please refer to my previous post and feel free to add a link in the comments.

Thanks again to Charles French for the nomination, be sure to check out his blog and recently released novel if you haven’t done so!

3 Quotations in 3 Days Challenge

Charles French Words Reading and Writing https://charlesfrenchonwordsreadingandwriting.wordpress.com has nominated me to participate in the 3 Quotations in 3 Days Challenge. Thank you for thinking of me!

But I now find myself feeling like the worst choice for team captain – I have wonderful followers, but I honestly have no clue if they are interested in participating in this event. So I’m going to break the rules a little and leave it open for anyone to participate. If you decide to join, please leave a link to your post in the comments. I will also include a link to your blog for my next 2 posts. 

That’s right, rule breaker here. Hopefully spreading the clicks and the visits to all blogs around.

The Rules for the Challenge:

  1. Three quotations for three days.
  2. Three nominees each day (no repetition).
  3. Thank the person who nominated you.
  4. Inform the nominees.bluebird

My Quotation for Day 1:

“The moment you doubt whether you can fly, you cease for ever to be able to do it.”
― J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan

Thank you once again to Charles! Be sure to check out his wonderful blog and recently released novel.

Charles F. French Blogtour: Part 2

20160916_140100I know I’ve been eagerly awaiting Part 2 of Charles F. French’s Blogtour interview, and I am happy to share that the wait is over!

If you didn’t catch Part 1 of the interview, be sure to click here and see what you missed. 

Charles is a fellow blogger, professor and author. His novel, Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I, has been released on Kindle, and the print version will follow later this month. He was kind enough to answer some questions I had regarding his writing process and his novel:

Q: Can you give me the backstory of some of your characters?

Roosevelt Theodore Franklin is the protagonist of the novel. He is a retire Marine Corps officer and a retire History professor who lost his beloved wife, Sarah, to cancer a few years before the story begins. His two closest friends, Sam and Jeremy also have lost loved ones to death. Sam is a retired homicide detective, and Jeremy is a retired antiques dealer. Sam’s son, when he was a teenager, committed suicide, and Jeremy’s partner, died in his arms while the two were attending a gallery opening.

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