NaNoWriMo: Wrap-up; Drained Ambition, Renewed Effort to Come

shield-nano-side-blue-brown-rgb-hires

And as swiftly as it arrived, it was over. National Novel Writing Month of 2016 concluded with a small whooshing sound, as it passed me by while I juggled too many projects to keep up. 

In the end, I reached nearly 25k words, half of what I set out to do. The fighter/winner in me is ashamed to admit I did not slay the NaNo beast. But the sensible/insightful in me is proud that I put myself out there. It was important for me to take a step forward, to take a chance. I may not have finished as I intended, but I still tried. Sometimes trying is more important than achieving. 

It doesn’t matter what kept me from achieving my goal. What is important is that I learned a lot about my writing process, and I allowed my mind to fully immerse in a world again. It has been a long time, and it felt like I was returning home after a long absence.

And now I know I owe it to myself and my world to continue on, and get the story out. So that’s what I’ll continue to do – just on a different schedule!

So congrats fellow writers that beat NaNo, you are awesome! And congrats fellow writers who tried, you are awesome too! Regardless of how many steps we took during the crazy month of November, they were all advancements towards a goal, and that itself is important to be proud of.

Advertisements

Get It Covered!

 

orderofthesolsticecover-v3

So according to the NaNoWriMo website, a novel with a cover is 60% more likely to win. With a statement like that, how could I not add a cover?

I’ve been intrigued by multiple posts from self publishers praising cover design services. Like any service, there are ranging in quality vs price points and time line. I’ve looked through a few of the galleries and thought to myself, “I think I could do that.”

So here’s my first attempt. What do you think? Would you pick this book up if you passed by it at the bookstore? 

Brushing off my design skills has been fun/painful, but I am enjoying the creative outlet. I was considering a post that would show the different photos used for this cover compilation, is that something that you readers might be interested in?

I’m struggling to address you, the reader, directly, because I’m petrified that no one will answer these questions, and I’ll feel like the left out kid at the park. But embracing a fear creates a strength, so I am gonna just go with it!

Charles F. French Blogtour: Part 2

20160916_140100I know I’ve been eagerly awaiting Part 2 of Charles F. French’s Blogtour interview, and I am happy to share that the wait is over!

If you didn’t catch Part 1 of the interview, be sure to click here and see what you missed. 

Charles is a fellow blogger, professor and author. His novel, Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I, has been released on Kindle, and the print version will follow later this month. He was kind enough to answer some questions I had regarding his writing process and his novel:

Q: Can you give me the backstory of some of your characters?

Roosevelt Theodore Franklin is the protagonist of the novel. He is a retire Marine Corps officer and a retire History professor who lost his beloved wife, Sarah, to cancer a few years before the story begins. His two closest friends, Sam and Jeremy also have lost loved ones to death. Sam is a retired homicide detective, and Jeremy is a retired antiques dealer. Sam’s son, when he was a teenager, committed suicide, and Jeremy’s partner, died in his arms while the two were attending a gallery opening.

Continue reading

Charles F. French Blogtour: Part 1

20160916_140100

Please enjoy the first of a two part interview with Charles F. French. Charles is a fellow blogger, professor and author. His upcoming novel, Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I, is going to be released later this month. He was kind enough to answer some questions I had regarding his writing process and his novel:

Q: What was the main inspiration for your novel?

Several ideas for novels have come to me in what might be considered an odd way, although I do not mind that at all! I had an image one day of a tall, older, dapper gentleman, dressed in a tailored old-fashioned, British wool suit, with short hair, and I wondered who he was. Slowly I worked with him, and the idea for the story emerged. In terms of inspiration, I certainly can point to several novelists, all of whom have influenced me with their thematic concern of the necessity for ordinary people to confront evil: Bram Stoker, John Connelly, and Stephen King.

Continue reading